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Cooking for Dogs and Wolves!

Treat your dogs to home-cooked pet food

The woman responsible for the diet of the Louisville Zoo’s maned wolves cares for smaller animals, too: Karla Haas is the founder of Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine. She explains how to make your own dog food to keep pets healthy. Rudy Green’s is available at Kroger and Amazon. Learn more about home cooking for your dog at RudyGreens.com

INGREDIENTS TO AVOID

Pet Food Ingredients to Avoid

In light of yet another dangerous pet food recall, Rudy Green’s is providing this list (copied from a compilation by nutritionist Sabine Contreras) of commonly used items that should be avoided.  Unlike our ingredient list, which is proudly displayed on the front of our package and contains only REAL FOOD,  most pet foods have fine print panels that you should be reading carefully!

 

Additives
Glyceryl Monostearate A lipophilic non-ionic surfactant with HLB of 3.6 – 4.2. It has effects of emulsification, dispersion, foaming, defoaming, starch anti-aging and fat agglomeration control, and is widely used in foodstuffs, cosmetic, medicine and plastic processing industries. It is an emulsifier used the most widely and in the largest quantities in the foodstuff industry.

A thickening, emulsifying, antisticking and antistalant agent. Can contain up to 200 ppm butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a preservative (see also BHT). Depending on method of manufacture, it can also contain glyceryl distearate (42-44%), glyceryl tristearate (20-23%), free glycerol (3-5%). Other impurities include mono-, di-, and triesters of related fatty acids as well as unreacted fatty acids. Due to the uncertainty of chemical additives, this ingredient should be avoided.


Phosphoric Acid A clear colorless liquid, H3PO4, used in fertilizers, detergents, food flavoring, and pharmaceuticals.

A harmless but unnecessary ingredient, used in inexpensive, poor quality dog food as flavoring, emulsifier and discoloration inhibitor. Used for example as a flavoring for Coca Cola.


Propylene Glycol A colorless viscous hygroscopic liquid, CH3CHOHCH2OH, used in antifreeze solutions, in hydraulic fluids, and as a solvent.

Used as humectant in semi-moist kibble to keep it from drying out. May be toxic if consumed in large amounts, and should definitely not be an ingredient in a food an animal will eat daily for weeks, months or even years of its life. In countries of the European Union, propylene glycol is not cleared as a general-purpose food grade product or direct food additive.

Binders
Corn Gluten I have not been able to locate an official definition of this product, but since it is contained in only one formulation of one manufacturer (Excel Chunks/Mini Chunks), I assume it is the same as “Corn Gluten Meal”.

An inexpensive by-product of human food processing which offers very little nutritional value and serves mainly to bind food together. It is not a harmful ingredient but should be avoided simply for its poor nutritional value and quality.


Wheat Gluten AAFCO: The tough, viscid nitrogenous substance remaining when wheat is washed to remove the starch.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing with almost no nutritional value left, serves mostly as a binder.

Carbohydrate Sources
Brewers Rice Also appears in ingredient lists as ground Brewers Rice.

AAFCO: The small milled fragments of rice kernels that have been separated from the larger kernels of milled rice.

A processed rice product that is missing many of the nutrients contained in whole ground rice and brown rice. Contrary to what many pet food companies want to make you believe, this is not a high quality ingredient, just much cheaper than whole grain rice.


Cereal Food Fines AAFCO: Particles of breakfast cereals obtained as a byproduct of their processing.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing of unknown source, quality, possible chemical residue, sweeteners or other additives.


Feeding Oat Meal AAFCO: Feeding oat meal is obtained in the manufacture of rolled oat groats or rolled oats and consists of broken oat groats, oat groat chips, and floury portions of the oat groats, with only such quantity of finely ground oat hulls as is unavoidable in the usual process of commericial milling.

A food-grade fractionated grain, byproduct from human food processing, that is not as nutritionally valuable as the product obtained from whole oats.


Grain Fermentation Solubles AAFCO: The dried material resulting from drying the water soluble materials after separation of suspended solids from grain fermentation.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food and beverage production which adds little or no nutritional value to pet foods.


Maltodextrins & Fermentation Solubles I have not been able to locate an official definition for this product so far.

A brewery byproduct much like “grain fermentation solubles”, with some maltodextrin from malted barley. Better suited for use in short term feeding like e.g. livestock than as an ingredient in pet food.


Potato Product AAFCO: Potato pieces, peeling, culls, etc., obtained from the manufacture of processed potato products for human consumption.

A cheap byproduct of human food processing that has been stripped of much of the nutritional benefits that whole, fresh potatos offer.


Soy Flour AAFCO: The finely powdered material resulting from the screened and graded product after removal of most of the oil from selected, sound, cleaned and dehulled soybeans by a mechanical or solvent extraction process.

Much of the nutritional value is lost already during processing of the grain to flour. May contain particles of hull, germ, and the offal from the tail of the mill.

Coloring Agents
Blue 2 (artificial color) The color additive FD&C Blue No. 2 is principally the disodium salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)- 2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid with smaller amounts of the disodium salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-7-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid and the sodium salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 2 is obtained by heating indigo (or indigo paste) in the presence of sulfuric acid. The color additive is isolated and subjected to purification procedures. The indigo (or indigo paste) used above is manufactured by the fusion of N-phenylglycine (prepared from aniline and formaldehyde) in a molten mixture of sodamide and sodium and potassium hydroxides under ammonia pressure. The indigo is isolated and subjected to purification procedures prior to sulfonation.

The largest study suggested, but did not prove, that this dye caused brain tumors in male mice. The FDA concluded that there is “reasonable certainty of no harm”, but personally I’d rather avoid this ingredient and err on the side of caution.


Red 40 (artificial color) The color additive FD&C Red No. 40 is principally the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy-5-[(2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid.

The most widely used food dye. While this is one of the most-tested food dyes, the key mouse tests were flawed and inconclusive. An FDA review committee acknowledged problems, but said evidence of harm was not “consistent” or “substantial.” Like other dyes, Red 40 is used mainly in junk foods. Personally I’d rather avoid this ingredient and err on the side of caution.


Titanium Dioxide A white powder, TiO2, used as an exceptionally opaque white pigment and dough conditioner.

Non toxic but an unnecessary ingredient that could just as well be left out.


Yellow 5 (artificial color) The color additive FD&C Yellow No. 5 is principally the trisodium salt of 4,5-dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-4- [4-sulfophenyl-azo]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (CAS Reg. No. 1934-21- 0). To manufacture the additive, 4-amino-benzenesulfonic acid is diazotized using hydrochloric acid and sodium nitrite. The diazo compound is coupled with 4,5-dihydro-5-oxo-1-(4-sulfophenyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid or with the methyl ester, the ethyl ester, or a salt of this carboxylic acid. The resulting dye is purified and isolated as the sodium salt.

The second most widely used coloring can cause mild allergic reactions, primarily in aspirin-sensitive persons.


Yellow 6 (artificial color) The color additive FD&C Yellow No. 6 is principally the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy-5-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (CAS Reg. No. 2783-94-0). The trisodium salt of 3-hydroxy-4-[(4- sulfophenyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid may be added in small amounts. The color additive is manufactured by diazotizing 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid using hydrochloric acid and sodium nitrite or sulfuric acid and sodium nitrite. The diazo compound is coupled with 6-hydroxy-2-naphthalene-sulfonic acid. The dye is isolated as the sodium salt and dried. The trisodium salt of 3-hydroxy-4-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid which may be blended with the principal color is prepared in the same manner except the diazo benzenesulfonic acid is coupled with 3-hydroxy-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid.

Industry-sponsored animal tests indicated that this dye, the third most widely used, causes tumors of the adrenal gland and kidney. In addition, small amounts of several carcinogens contaminate Yellow 6. However, the FDA reviewed those data and found reasons to conclude that Yellow 6 does not pose a significant cancer risk to humans. Yellow 6 may also cause occasional allergic reactions. Another ingredient I would rather avoid and err on the side of caution rather than risking my pet’s health.

Fat Sources
Animal Fat AAFCO: Obtained from the tissues of mammals and/or poultry in the commercial processes of rendering or extracting. It consists predominantly of glyceride esters of fatty acids and contains no additions of free fatty acids. If an antioxidant is used, the common name or names must be indicated, followed by the words “used as a preservative”.

Note that the animal source is not specified and is not required to originate from “slaughtered” animals. The rendered animals can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), goats, pigs, horses, rats, misc. roadkill, animals euthanized at shelters, restaurant and supermarket refuse and so on.


Beef Tallow AAFCO: Fat with titer above 40 degrees Celsius, obtained from the tissue of cattle in the commercial process of rendering. Also called Beef Fat.

Dogs and cats like the taste of this fat, so it is often used to make low-quality food more palatable. Beef tallow is very low in linoleic acid and much cheaper for the pet food industry to use than a good quality vegetable oil or nutritionally rich chicken fat.


Lard AAFCO: The rendered fat of swine.

Very low in linoleic acid but very attractive to pets, used to make poor quality food more appealing. Few nutritional benefits.


Poultry Fat AAFCO: Obtained from the tissue of poultry in the commercial process of rendering or extracting. It shall contain only the fatty matter natural to the product produced under good manufacturing practices and shall contain no added free fatty acids or other materials obtained from fat. It must contain not less than 90 percent total fatty acids and not more than 3 percent of unsaponifiables and impurities. It shall have a minimum titer of 33 degrees Celsius. If an antioxidant is used, the common name or names must be indicated, followed by the word “preservative(s)”.

Note how in this product the source is not defined as “slaughtered poultry”. The rendered fowl can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), turkey, chicken, geese, buzzard, seagulls, misc. roadkill, birds euthanized at shelters and so on.


Vegetable Oil AAFCO: The product of vegetable origin obtained by extracting the oil from seeds or fruits which are processed for edible purposes.

The source vegetables for this oil (and therefore the nutrient properties or lack thereof) are unknown. Wouldn’t you like to know just what exactly you are feeding your pet?

Fiber Sources
Cellulose AAFCO: Purified, mechanically disintegrated cellulose prepared by processing alpha cellulose obtained as a pulp from fibrous plant materials.

Dried wood is the most common source for cellulose (I’m not kidding.). It is cleaned, processed into a fine powder and used to add bulk and consistency to cheap pet foods. I would consider this ingredient appropriate for termites, but certainly not for dogs or cats.


Corn Bran AAFCO: The outer coating of the corn kernel.

An inexpensive source of fiber that serves as a filler ingredient to add bulk to poor quality pet food.


Corn Cellulose AAFCO: A product obtained from the cell walls of corn.

Obtained by use of a chemical process, it is used to add bulk and consistency to cheap pet foods and has no nutritional value.


Oat Hulls I have not been able to locate an official definition for this product so far.

Most likely what is left over from dehulling the whole oat kernels after harvesting, comparable to peanut hulls. It is not the same as oat bran (the hull that protects the grain itself), which is a quality source of dietary fiber and removed prior to rolling and/or flaking. Thumbs down for this filler ingredient.


Peanut Hulls AAFCO: The outer hull of the peanut shell.

No nutritional value whatsoever, and are used exclusively as a cheap filler ingredient. Possibility of pesticide residues being present.


Rice Hulls AAFCO: The outer covering of rice.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing, serving as a source of fiber that is considered a filler ingredient.


Soybean Mill Run AAFCO: Composed of soybean hulls and such bean meats that adhere to the hulls which results from normal milling operations in the production of dehulled soybean meal.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing, commonly referred to as ‘floor sweepings’. An inexpensive filler with no real nutritional value.


Wheat Mill Run May also appear as “Wheat Middlings”.

AAFCO: Coarse and fine particles of wheat bran and fine particles of wheat shorts, wheat germ, wheat flour and offal from the “tail of the mill”.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing, commonly referred to as ‘floor sweepings’. An inexpensive filler with no real nutritional value.

Flavoring Agents
Animal Digest AAFCO: A material which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed animal tissue. The animal tissues used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth, hooves and feathers, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice and shall be suitable for animal feed. If it bears a name descriptive of its kind or flavor(s), it must correspond thereto.

A cooked-down broth made from unspecified parts of unspecified animals. The animals used can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), goats, pigs, horses, rats, misc. roadkill, animals euthanized at shelters, restaurant and supermarket refuse and so on.


Digest May also appear as dried, or spray dried. Sometimes the type and part of animals used is specified, such as in “Chicken Digest”, “Lamb Digest” or “Poultry Liver Digest”

AAFCO: Material which results from chemical and/or enzymatic hydrolysis of clean and undecomposed animal tissue. The animal tissues used shall be exclusive of hair, horns, teeth, hooves and feathers, except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice and shall be suitable for animal feed. .

A cooked-down broth made from specified, or worse, unspecified parts of specified or unspecified animals (depending on the type of digest used). If the source is unspecified (e.g. “Animal” or “Poultry”, the animals used can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), goats, pigs, horses, rats, misc. roadkill, animals euthanized at shelters, restaurant and supermarket refuse and so on.


Flavor A substance, such as an extract or spice, that add flavor to a product.

The manufacturer may or may not give more detailed information about what is used for flavoring and whether it is made from a natural or chemical substance.


Glandular Meal I have not been able to locate an official definition for this product so far.

Since it is used as a “source of liver flavor” in poor quality foods, it is safe to assume that it is a meal obtained from the livers and other glands of various, unspecified animals. As with all generic, unspecified ingredients, it is wise to avoid.

Fruits & Vegetables
Apple Pomace AAFCO: The mixture of apple skins, pulp, and crushed seeds.

An inexpensive byproduct of human food processing. Does not contain the whole complement of nutrients as whole fresh or dried apples.


Citrus Pulp Citrus Pulp is the dried residue of peel, pulp and seeds of oranges, grapefruit and other citrus fruit.

This inexpensive byproduct is mainly used as a bulk carbohydrate concentrate in cattle feed but also added as a source of fiber in dog food. Since the peel and some twigs and leaves are also included, there is a possibility of residues from pesticides and synthetic fertilizers.


Grape Pomace AAFCO: The mixture of grape skins, pulp, and crushed seeds.

An inexpensive byproduct left over from pressing grapes for juice or wine. The product contributes some fiber but otherwise has little to no nutritinal value. Grapes have also shown to contain a substance that is toxic to dogs, so they should not be fed at all.


Preservatives
BHA Butylated Hydroxysanisole – a white, waxy phenolic antioxidant, C11H16O2, used to preserve fats and oils, especially in foods.

Banned from human use in many countries but still permitted in the US. Possible human carcinogen, apparently carcinogenic in animal experiments. The oxidative characteristics and/or metabolites of BHA and BHT may contribute to carcinogenicity or tumorigenicity.


BHT Butylated Hydroxytoluene – a crystalline phenolic antioxidant, C15H24O, used to preserve fats and oils, especially in foods.

Banned from human use in many countries but still permitted in the US. Possible human carcinogen, apparently carcinogenic in animal experiments. The oxidative characteristics and/or metabolites of BHA and BHT may contribute to carcinogenicity or tumorigenicity.


Ethoxyquin 6-ethoxy-1,2-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline. Antioxidant; also a post-harvest dip to prevent scald on apples and pears.

Originally developed by Monsanto as a stabilizer for rubber, Ethoxyquin has also been used as a pesticide for fruit and a color preservative for spices, and later for animal feed. The original FDA permit for use as stabilizer in animal feed limited use to two years and did not include pet food, but it falls under the same legal category. It has never been proven to be safe for the lifespan of a companion animal.It has been linked to thyroid, kidney, reproductive and immune related illnesses as well as cancer, but so far no conclusive, reliable research results either for the safety of this product or against it have not been obtained. Monsanto conducted research years ago, but results were so inconclusive due to unprofessional conduct and documentation that the FDA demanded another study. There are currently several studies underway to determine whether Ethoxyquin is safe or not, and until those studies are completed, pet food suppliers may continue to use Ethoxyquin. This is how things stand after about 6 years, and no new details have emerged so far.


Propyl Gallate Also known as Gallic Acid or Propyl Ester. It is made from natural Gallic Acid, which is obtained by the hydrolysis of tannins from Tara Pods.

Used as an antioxidant to stabilize cosmetics, food packaging materials, and foods containing fats. I have not found conclusive evidence either for or against the safety of this product, but it is suspected of causing liver diseases and cancer, so once again personally I prefer to err on the side of caution. Mixed tocopherols, citric acid and rosemary extract are effective, all-natural alternatives – just more expensive.

Protein Sources
Beef & Bone Meal AAFCO: The rendered product from beef tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents, except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

A byproduct made from beef parts which are not suitable for human consumption. It can incorporate the entire cow, including the bones, but the quality cuts of meat are always removed. This is an inexpensive, low quality ingredient used to boost the protein percentage.


Blood Meal AAFCO: Blood Meal is produced from clean, fresh animal blood, exclusive of all extraneous material such as hair, stomach belchings and urine except as might occur unavoidably in good manufacturing process. A large portion of the moisture is usually removed by a mechanical dewatering process or by condensing by cooking to a semi-solid state. The semi-solid blood mass is then transferred to a rapid drying facility where the more tightly bound water is rapidly removed. The minimum biological activity of lysine shall be 80%.

An inexpensive protein booster. You have no way of knowing what type of animal the blood came from or what residues of hormones, medications or other substances are in this product. It has a better use as fertilizer than as a dog food ingredient.


Chicken Byproduct Meal AAFCO: Consists of the dry, ground, rendered, clean parts of the carcass of slaughtered chicken, such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs, and intestines — exclusive of feathers except in such amounts as might occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

Chicken byproducts are much less expensive and less digestible than the chicken muscle meat.The ingredients of each batch can vary drastically in ingredients (heads, feet, bones etc.) as well as quality, thus the nutritional value is also not consistent. Don’t forget that byproducts consist of any parts of the animal OTHER than meat. If there is any use for any part of the animal that brings more profit than selling it as “byproduct”, rest assured it will appear in such a product rather than in the “byproduct” dumpster.


Corn Distillers Dried Grains With Solubles Distillers Dried Grains with solubles (DDGS) is the product obtained by condensing and drying the stillage that remains after fermenting the starch in corn or milo in the production of ethyl alcohol.

An inexpensive byproduct used as protein filler in cheap dog foods. Its amino acids are poorly balanced, not very digestible, have a high fiber content and nutritional value can vary greatly from batch to batch. Better suited as cattle feed.


Corn Germ Meal AAFCO: Ground corn germ which consists of corn germ with other parts of the corn kernel from which part of the oil has been removed and is obtained from either a wet or dry milling manufacturing process of corn meal, corn grits, hominy feed, or other corn products.

An inexpensive by-product of human food processing, rich in protein but sadly often used as a booster in poor quality foods. It is not a harmful ingredient but should not rank high in the ingredient list of a quality product.


Corn Gluten Meal AAFCO: The dried residue from corn after the removal of the larger part of the starch and germ, and the separation of the bran by the process employed in the wet milling manufacture of corn starch or syrup, or by enzymatic treatment of the endosperm.

An inexpensive by-product of human food processing which contains some protein but serves mainly to bind food together. It is not a harmful ingredient but should not rank high in the ingredient list of a quality product.


Fish Meal AAFCO: The clean, rendered, dried ground tissue of undecomposed whole fish or fish cuttings, either or both, with or without the extraction of part of the oil.

Like with all other animal sources, if a type isn’t specified, you never know what type or quality of fish is used.
According to US Coast Guard regulations, all fish meal not destined for human consumption must be conserved with Ethoxyquin (unless the manufacturer has a special permit). This preservative is banned from use in foods for human consumption except for the use of very small quantities as a color preservative for spices. So unless the manufacturer either presents a permit or states “human grade” fish or fish meal is used, you can be pretty sure Ethoxyquin is present in the food even if it is not listed.


Liver Meal AAFCO: The dried product of ground hepatic glands of mammals.

Whenever the word ‘meat’ or the name of an organ appear by themselves (without a species) on a pet food label, there is no way to know which kind of animal it came from. It could be horse liver, goat, duck, pig, or even skunk or other animals of questionable origin.


Meat & Bone Meal AAFCO: The rendered product from mammal tissues, with or without bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

The animal parts used can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), goats, pigs, horses, rats, misc. roadkill, animals euthanized at shelters and so on. It can also include pus, cancerous tissue, and decomposed (spoiled) tissue.


Meat Meal AAFCO: The rendered product from mammal tissues, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

The animal parts used can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), goats, pigs, horses, rats, misc. roadkill, animals euthanized at shelters and so on. It can also include pus, cancerous tissue, and decomposed (spoiled) tissue.


Pork & Bone Meal AAFCO: The rendered product from pork tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, skin, manure, stomach and rumen contents, except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

A byproduct made from pork parts which are not suitable for human consumption. It can incorporate the entire pig, including the bones, but the quality cuts of meat are always removed. This is an inexpensive, low quality ingredient used to boost the protein percentage.


Poultry Byproduct Meal AAFCO: Consists of the ground, rendered, clean parts of the carcasses of slaughtered poultry, such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs, and intestines, exclusive of feathers except in such amounts as might occur unavoidably in good processing practices.

The parts used can be obtained from any slaughtered fowl, so there is no control over the quality and consistency of individual batches. Poultry byproducts are much less expensive and less digestible than chicken meat.The ingredients of each batch can vary drastically in ingredients (heads, feet, bones, organs etc.) as well as quality, thus the nutritional value is also not consistent. Don’t forget that byproducts consist of any parts of the animal OTHER than meat. If there is any use for any part of the animal that brings more profit than selling it as “byproduct”, rest assured it will appear in such a product rather than in the “byproduct” dumpster.


Poultry Meal AAFCO: The clean combination of poultry flesh and skin with or without bone. Does not contain feathers, heads, feet or entrails. If from a particular source it may state so (i.e. chicken, turkey etc).

Note how in this product the source is not defined as “slaughtered poultry”.The manufacturer does not disclose the species (or the mix of species) of the poultry used. The fowl can be obtained from any source, so there is no control over quality or contamination. Any kind of animal can be included: “4-D animals” (dead, diseased, disabled, or dying prior to slaughter), turkey, chicken, geese, buzzard, seagulls, misc. roadkill, birds euthanized at shelters and so on.


Soybean Meal AAFCO: The product obtained by grinding the flakes which remain after removal of most of the oil from soybeans by a solvent or mechanical extraction process.

A poor quality protein filler used to boost the protein content of low quality pet foods. Has a biologic value lof ess than 50% of chicken meal.

Supplements
Bone Phosphate Bone Phosphate is the residue of bones that have been treated first in a caustic solution then in a hydrochloric acid solution, and thereafter precipitated with lime and dried.

A highly processed feed-grade supplement to balance the calcium and phosphorus content of a product.


Salt Also listed as Sodium Chloride. A colorless or white crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used extensively in ground or granulated form as a food seasoning and preservative. May also appear in ingredient list as “Iodized Salt” (iodine supplement added), “Sea Salt” (as opposed to salt mined from underground deposits) or “Sodium Chloride” (chemical expression).

While salt is a necessary mineral, it is also generally present in sufficient quantities in the ingredients pet foods include. Just like for humans, too much sodium intake is unhealthy for animals. In poor quality foods it is often used in large amounts to add flavor and make the food more interesting.


Mineral Oil Any of various light hydrocarbon oils, especially a distillate of petroleum.

Mineral oil functions as a laxative and stool softener. I have not found any evidence of any other health benefits. Tells a lot about the product it is used in, doesn’t it?


Yeast Culture AAFCO: The dried product composed of yeast and the media on which it is grown, dried in such a manner as to preserve the fermenting activity of the yeast.

An unnecessary, feed-grade ingredient in pet foods, added mainly as a flavoring to make inexpensive food more attractive. Lacks the nutritional value of higher quality yeast supplements. The media on which the yeast was grown is not identified. Also a potential allergen for some dogs.


Yeast Fermentation Solubles AAFCO: The soluble portion of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and the media in which is produced.

A feed-grade ingredient in pet foods, added as a vitamin B supplement. It is harmless, but lacks the nutrients of higher quality yeast supplements. The media on which the yeast was grown is not identified. Also a potential allergen for some dogs.


Sweeteners
Cane Molasses AAFCO: A by-product of the manufacture of sucrose from sugar cane. It must contain not less than 43% total sugars expressed as invert.

Sugar or sweetener is an absolutely unnecessary ingredient in pet foods, added to make the product more attractive. Continuous intake can promote hypoglycemia, obesity, nervousness, cataracts, tooth decay, arthritis and allergies. Pets also get addicted to foods that contain sugars, so it can be a tough piece of work to make them eat something healthier.


Corn Syrup A syrup prepared from cornstarch, used in industry and in numerous food products as a sweetener.

Sugar or sweetener is an absolutely unnecessary ingredient in pet foods, added to make the product more attractive. Continuous intake can promote hypoglycemia, obesity, nervousness, cataracts, tooth decay, arthritis and allergies. Pets also get addicted to foods that contain sugars, so it can be a tough piece of work to make them eat something healthier.


Fructose A very sweet sugar, C6H12O6, occurring in many fruits and honey and used as a preservative for food and as an intravenous nutrient.

A monosaccharide found naturally in fresh fruit and honey. It is obtained by the inversion of sucrose by means of the enzyme invertase. Used in small quantities it serves as a nutrient for probiotics, specifically bifidobacteria, which ferment it and produce beneficial enzymes.


Sorbitol A white, sweetish, crystalline alcohol, C6H8(OH)6, found in various berries and fruits or prepared synthetically and used as a flavoring agent, a sugar substitute for people with diabetes, and a moisturizer in cosmetics and other products.

Sugar or sweetener is an absolutely unnecessary ingredient in pet foods, added to make the product more attractive. Continuous intake can promote hypoglycemia, obesity, nervousness, cataracts, tooth decay, arthritis and allergies. Pets also get addicted to foods that contain sugars, so it can be a tough piece of work to make them eat something healthier.


Sugar Can include sucrose, cane sugar, caramel, corn syrup and others.

Sugar or sweetener is an absolutely unnecessary ingredient in pet foods, added to make the product more attractive. Continuous intake can promote hypoglycemia, obesity, nervousness, cataracts, tooth decay, arthritis and allergies. Pets also get addicted to foods that contain sugars, so it can be a tough piece of work to make them eat something healthier.


Dl-Alpha Tocopherol Acetate Synthetic vitamin E, also listed as Dl-Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate

Only about half as effective as natural vitamin E and not as readily available to the body.

Vitamins
Menadione Sodium Bisulfate Vitamin K3, synthetic vitamin K.
Feed grade. Also listed as Menadione Dimethyl-Pyrimidinol Bisulfate, Menadione Dimethyl-Pyrimidinol Bisulfite, Menadione Sodium Bisulfate Complex, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite and Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex.

Unnecessary ingredient in dog food. This synthetic version of vitamin K has not been specifically approved for long term use, such as in pet food. It has been linked to many serious health issues. More Details


Cincinnati Area Kroger Stores Now Carry Rudy Green’s!

Attention Ohio and Northern Kentucky Rudy Fans- You can now buy your dog’s FAVORITE FOOD at your neighborhood Kroger Store! Select varieties of the one and only REAL, HUMAN-GRADE FOOD FOR DOGS are available in pet aisle freezer sections of nearly 30 Cincy area locations.

Be sure and collect the Rudy Rewards paw prints from back of package to earn free product or to help rescue animals

Check our Facebook page for local specials and events.
Here is a list of the stores by zip code:

428 Oxford State Rd Middletown OH 45044
11390 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati OH 45249
300 S Locust St Oxford OH 45056
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Protect Your Dog from Poisoning

Guest Post by Emily Ridgewell

Top 10 Poisonous Plants For Pets (Following A Sad Puppy Fatality)

The death of an adorable little Siberian Husky puppy recently shocked and rocked a small suburb of Sacramento. After he was found snacking on some poisonous mushrooms in the family’s yard, bad reactions from the little pup sent the family to the vet’s office and sadly things took a turn for the worse.

This small and seemingly insignificant oversight proved fatal for this particular young pooch and headlines of his tragic death saddened local area residents just before the Christmas season began to unfold last year. Although this local story didn’t get much in the way of national recognition, perhaps it should have been more widely circulated to serve as a warning to other pet owners.

Not only are animals in danger from these types of often overlooked types of toxins, children can also be at risk when it comes to the consumption of plants that are potentially poisonous if ingested. Technically, mushrooms are considered a fungus and not a part of the plant family, but we can all strive to be better educated when it comes to certain flora that could prove fatal for our four-legged friends.

A Potentially Lethal List

We mentioned poinsettias previously and most of us are already aware this holiday favorite is well-known for being poisonous. But according to the Pet Poison Hotline, they’re only “mildly toxic” to our pets, friends and family. Still, it’s a very valid reason to keep these types of beautiful plants away from our beloved pets (and children).

This stern warning is also followed by an important post from the folks over at the Pet Poison Hotline which highlights the top ten poisonous plants for pets. Here they are in alphabetical order:

1. Autumn Crocus – these Spring bloomers are renowned for causing gastric distress with pets including vomiting and diarrhea.
2. Azalea – with the same resulting symptoms including excessive salivation, pets could fall into a coma after eating this popular plant.
3. Cyclamen – For digging dogs, it’s the root of this plant (literally) that causes problems.
4. Daffodils – These popular favorites cause equally threatening conditions that can also result in cardiac arrhythmia.
5. Hyacinths – Another underground potential threat that is associated more with the bulbs rather than their flowers or leaves.
6. Kalanchoe – A succulent popular with many plant people, it’s also prone to cause diarrhea, vomiting and heart problems.
7. Lilies – The pollen in these plants has been so problematic, they’re often banned from hospitals and other health-care related facilities.
8. Oleander – This popular hedge is often seen alongside freeways in SoCal, but they can cause death in severe situations.
9. Sago Palm – Speaking of down south, the seeds of this popular palm
10. Tulips – Popular in Danish culture, but traumatic when it comes to canine consumption.

Conquering This Conundrum

Obviously the best option for protecting our pets is not having these plants in our possession in the first place. But on the other hand, for plant lovers, we can find some other harmonious solutions in order to avoid this particular problem. For example, keep these types of plants completely out of reach when it comes to your pets (for cats this could be problematic).

For canine lovers, train them to stay away from plants in general, both indoors and out. Especially when it comes to walking your dog since they’re instinctually driven to sniff out and explore other animals urine and feces that are often near foliage. It almost goes without saying the many health risks associated with this type of practice.

Along with all pet owners and animal lovers, we can be more proactive about what goes into their mouths. That’s why we strive to ensure what your pet eats is what’s best for their overall health and welfare. Please reply if you have other important tips and tricks to keep our pets at their best!

Sources:

http://www.kcra.com/article/puppy-dies-after-eating-poisonous-mushrooms-in-loomis/14384708
https://www.kremp.com/dangerous-plants-and-flowers-for-kids-and-pets

Poinsettia


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/2574347/Flowers-banned-from-hospital-wards.html

How Did the Louisville Zoo Help Two Wolves Reproduce? Through Food.

Rudy Green was 14 when he was diagnosed with a bleeding ulcer — a dooming aliment for the elderly chocolate lab.

A veterinarian said there was little to be done. But to buy the dog another week, owner Karla Haas could try feeding it nothing but fresh, unprocessed foods.

The directive made Haas think. If kibble was made for dogs, then why would a vet not recommend it for hers?

The simple question started Haas on a 10-year journey, in which she launched an all-natural dog food line and earned national attention for her work with the Louisville Zoo.

Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine, which first hit grocery stores in 2007, is now sold on Amazon and in approximately 450 Kroger pet food aisles across America.

It was a slow build, Haas said. But with more people looking into the foods they eat, her product has taken off with customers who want to give the same consideration to their dogs.
“You would never dream of giving your kid nothing but Cheerios for every meal, every day of his life,” Haas said. “Yet we’ve been brainwashed to think this is what dogs should eat.”
Haas never expected to get into the pet food business. She holds a degree in social work but spent the past few decades switching between careers, from modeling to sales management.

The only constant during that time was her volunteer work at dog rescues and animal shelters across several states. In Louisville, Haas rattled off a list of organizations for which she’s offered assistance, including the Shamrock Pet Foundation and Derby City Dog Rescue.

Saving dogs is Haas’s passion. And she can’t think of any better way to sustain herself while bettering the lives of pets than through her business, Rudy Green’s.

The line of natural dog food offers five recipes, sold for $10.49 per box in pet aisle freezers. Each box includes four 6-ounce packets of food that can supplement a sick dog’s kibble diet.
“It’s meant to be mixed in,” said Haas, who added that owners stretch out a box by reducing portions. “Most could never afford to do just this. Frankly, I still give my dogs dry food. But I know what’s in it, and I know where it’s made.”

Within three years of launching, Haas’s work caught the attention of a Louisville Zoo employee, who recommended her to a team of co-workers tasked with improving the health of the facility’s maned wolves.

Maned wolves are a near-threatened species indigenous to South America, zookeeper Angela Johnson said. And while they fall into the wolf category, they eat nothing like other members of the canid sector.
The red-coated wolves are finicky, said Johnson, who calls them “canine toddlers.” Five-year-olds Sadie and Rocko at the Louisville Zoo are no exceptions.

The pair of maned wolves are unwilling to eat various foods and are genetically dispositioned to develop certain diseases. In their time at the zoo, Sadie and Rocko have both been underweight with low muscle mass, and Sadie has struggled with irritable bowel disease.

Because of the issues, the two wolves have not been able to reproduce, Johnson said. But after working with Haas and a nutrition specialist to develop a healing recipe for Sadie, the female wolf gained enough weight to give birth to two pups this past Valentine’s Day — a big win for the entire population.

“We talked early on and said first and foremost, we want our wolves to get better and do well and thrive,” said Johnson, who’s worked at the zoo for more than 20 years. “If that works, we want other wolves to have the same benefits.
“This diet isn’t for every single wolf. But it shows a fresh, less processed diet can do good.”

Haas said she’s now working with the nutrition specialist to develop additional recipes the wolves can eat during off-breeding seasons. And other zoos have expressed interest in purchasing the first recipe — named Sadie’s Stew.

“We have had some setbacks along the way,” Johnson said. “… But this diet does seem to keep (Sadie) on track and keeps things going pretty well for her.”
If pet owners want to improve the diets of their own dogs, Johnson recommended trying to supplement kibble with fresh foods slowly.

“It’s expensive to eat healthy and it’s expensive to feed your pets healthy, also,” Johnson said. “Something fresh is better than nothing fresh.”

Reach reporter Bailey Loosemore at 502-582-4646 or bloosemore@courier-journal.com.
RUDY GREEN’S DOGGY CUISINE

What: An all-natural dog food produced in Kentucky at a USDA-certified facility. The dog food comes in five recipes, such as ground beef with brown rice, peas and corn.

Where: Find Rudy Green’s in the pet aisle freezer at Kroger, Rainbow Blossom and ValuMarket in Louisville or online at Amazon.

Cost: $11.99 per four-pack in stores or $64.95 for five boxes on Amazon

More info: Five-percent of the product’s sales are donated to various animal shelters. Learn more at rudygreens.com.

Madame Bunny’s Pop Up Booth

Madame Bunny, Fortune Smeller and Paw Reader had a pop-up booth today. Free Dog Psychic Advice available at https://www.facebook.com/RudyGreens Post a picture of your dog and any cosmic concerns. Fortune Smelling and Paw Reading available by appointment only.

Real Food for Dogs for Over 10 Years

10 years ago today, the Louisville Courier-Journal ran this article on the launch of Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine in a few local stores. Thanks to our loyal customers we are still growing and are in over 500 stores across the country (and online through amazon everywhere else)!
We appreciate those smart dog parents who know the difference between processes brown nuggets and REAL meat and veggies. Thank you for supporting our mission to improve the quality of pet food and pet’s lives!

Rudy Green’s Maned Wolf Diet Leads to 2 Pups!

Zoo Celebrates Birth of

Two Maned Wolf Pups

 

The Louisville Zoo is thrilled to announce the birth of two maned wolf pups. The two females were born February 14 to Sadie and Rocko, both five years old. Each weighed about 7 pounds at the time of their neonatal examinations.

 

Maned wolf gestation is similar to a domestic dog which is about two months. Sadie has nursed the pups since they were born and they should be weaned at around 4 months of age.  Both parents will also regurgitate food to the pups to assist with the transition from milk to solid foods.

The Louisville Zoo is continually seeking the very best methods in nutrition, veterinary care, and animal husbandry and consistently monitors the health of the animals. Prior to the fall/winter breeding season, zoo keepers and veterinary staff developed a plan to optimize the health of both adult wolves.  Sadie was underweight, had a poor appetite, and suboptimal stool quality.  Following a thorough medical evaluation and treatment plan, a diet change was pursued to improve food intake, body condition, and stool quality. This diet change was achieved with collaboration with the Maned Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) nutritionist Dr. Cheryl Morris and  Rudy Green’s Doggy CuisineTM creator and President Karla Haas. Special custom-made whole food recipes were developed by these renowned professionals in the field using human grade meats and vegetables.     The Rudy Green brand has been producing human grade, gently cooked food for dogs since 2006 and is sold in Kroger pet aisle freezers and online via amazon.

 

The Louisville Zoo contacted Ms. Haas and together they began experimenting with a custom formulated diet in September 2016.  Both wolves were gradually transitioned onto it after initial testing of several recipes.  The new diet, in conjunction with recommended nutritional supplements by Dr. Morris, resulted in improvements in overall health. The Louisville Zoo is proud that this team approach has resulted in the birth of two maned wolf pups, the first for the Louisville Zoo in 10 years.

The Rudy Green’s Maned Wolf Diet is nick-named “Sadie’s Stew”and interest in alternative and more healthful diets for the maned wolves is spreading among zoos nationally.

ABOUT MANED WOLVES

The maned wolf is native to South America and can be found throughout Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Uruguay. Maned wolves are solitary. The maned wolf is an omnivore. Half of their diet is fruit supplemented with small mammals, birds and reptiles, insects, nuts, eggs and grass. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species lists the maned wolf as threatened.

 

Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine™ Expansion Contributes to Species Improved Health

Louisville, KY – A company known as a pioneer in the Human Grade Pet Food movement has expanded their offerings to include food for other animals as well.  Rudy Green, Inc., manufacturer of Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine™, is now producing a special diet designed to restore health and vitality to maned wolves living in zoos across the country.

About Maned Wolves

Maned wolves are a species native to the grasslands and scrub forests of central South America, and are listed as endangered by the Brazilian government and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  There are now just 72 maned wolves living in 26 zoos throughout the country.

Sadie and Rocko’s Story

The Louisville Zoo is continually seeking the very best methods in nutrition and animal care. That’s why when a concern arose over the health of a pair of young maned wolves at the Zoo, forward-thinking staff and leaders moved to a customized whole-food based, gently cooked diet by Rudy Green’s,  which not only seemed to appeal to Sadie and Rocko, it addressed their nutritional needs as well. The Louisville Zoo began using the special diet in September 2016.

According to Rudy Green creator and President Karla Haas, the recipes were developed in collaboration with zoo personnel and renowned animal nutrition professor Dr. Cheryl Morris, utilizing simple, human-grade meats and vegetables.  “We had to consider every aspect of their physical condition as well as finding ingredients that matched what they consumed in the wild, blended together in a meal they would like” Haas adds.

Immediate Success

The new diet in conjunction with recommended supplementation by Dr. Morris seemed to improve the health of Sadie and Rocko.   Zoo keepers noticed consistent stool quality, improved coat quality, weight gain and consistent maintenance of weight— all measureable indicators of good health.

About Rudy Green’s

In 2006 a business was created out of a passion for animals and success with gently cooked human grade food prepared for the founder’s  sick old dog, Rudy Green, for which the company is named.   “It’s nonsense to believe that we should be feeding any animal a highly processed, nutritionally deplete, dry nugget that doesn’t resemble, nor contain, real food as the mainstay of their diet” said Ms. Haas.  Pet lovers can find Rudy Green’s Doggy Cuisine™ for their own four legged kids in Kroger stores pet aisle freezers and online through amazon. For more info see www.rudygreens.com.

Contact

Karla Haas, President, Rudy Green, Inc.

(502)817-0907

karla@rudygreens.com

Veterinarians issue warning about bacteria outbreak that could kill your dog

FOX 32 NEWS – Veterinarians have issued a warning about a serious bacteria outbreak that could kill your dog.

The bacteria is called “Lepto-spirosis” or “Lepto” for short. It infects dogs by burrowing into their skin. Then, it spreads throughout the dog’s body. The bacteria can also be transmitted to humans. More cases of the bacterial infection are being found in Chicago, especially in the Lake View area. Leptospirosis is spread through rats and if left unfound, can be deadly for dogs.

“While we’re all super excited about 70 degree weather, it is sort of the perfect storm for Leptospirosis exposure,” said Dr. Natalie Marks of Blum Animal Hospital. Doctor Marks says there’s been an uptick of dogs being tested for and contracting Leptospirosis – a bacterial infection spread by the urine of rodents.

“We are unfortunately, the rattiest city in the U.S. We were just given that title. So we have a very high population of rodents. We’ve had unseasonably warm and rainy weather.” Dr. Marks said.

She says that’s the perfect breeding ground for leptospirosis. It’s sprouting up all over the country and now in Chicago.

Read more